Posts

Road Rage

We’ll all encounter road rage this holiday season – some of us will cause it by “driving defensively,” and some of us will experience it thanks to the too-slow driver in the passing lane.

Regardless, here are a few tips to communicate effectively from the driver’s seat and avoid the fender bender that keeps on giving in the form of a higher deductible.

Eye Contact
Just like eye contact is key in an on-camera interview, it’s also a great way to guilt someone into letting you merge. And if you smile while making eye contact? Game over.

Once you’ve successfully merged, make sure to wave “thank you” to the driver who let you in.

Use that horn for good
Not all honks are created equal. If possible, communicate with a friendly honk. A light “excuse me” or “you’re about to hit my bumper” tap go a long way to de-escalate the situation.

Be self-aware
If you follow no other rules of the road this holiday season, please follow these two:

  1. The left lane is for passing ONLY. You will anger other drivers and impede the flow of traffic if you stubbornly choose to drive in this lane regardless of speed. Please drive on the right.
  2. If you anticipate needing to merge because your lane is ending, don’t drive all the way to the end of the lane and cut in front of those waiting in line. Abide by the zipper effect. Be kind, and get in line.

We wish you happy and safe travels!

Can’t take my eyes off of you

In honor of October baseball, we thought we’d take this opportunity to highlight a lesson Chicago Cubs’ catcher Taylor Davis can teach us about eye contact for TV.

While Davis was playing for the Iowa Cubs, the Triple-A affiliate for his current team, he made quite an impression on the camera…

If you’re doing TV interviews, Skype interviews, or Facebook Lives, you can learn a lesson from Davis.

Prolonged eye contact with a TV host or camera lens can seem really uncomfortable at first, because that’s not how we communicate in real life. But TV interviews aren’t real life and therefore play by a different set of rules – you have to maintain eye contact at all times to avoid looking distracted or disengaged.

Don’t be tempted to look away as you gather your thoughts; keep your eyes fixed on the camera or host.

TUESDAY TIP: Sunglasses in a TV interview. Yay or nay?

NAY. ALWAYS NAY. But let us explain…

Temps are rising, days are getting longer, and we’re finally moving outdoors – both personally and professionally.

What do we mean?

The possibility of a TV interview outside is a real and present danger in the coming months, and so we want you to be prepared. Over the next few weeks, we’ll highlight what to do and what NOT to do in front of the camera in the great outdoors.

Today’s focus is your eyes. Specifically, what NOT to do.

Q: “Can I wear sunglasses in TV interviews outside?”

A: “No. And here’s why…”

Obviously, this is an extreme example, but it proves our point. Though we understand that the sun (or any bright light) can be distracting, resist the temptation to keep those cool aviators on when the camera is rolling.

We know that wearing sunglasses makes your experience better, but it makes the viewer’s experience worse. We want to be able to make eye contact with someone, or watch people make eye contact with each other. It’s how we judge people’s character and the validity of their statements.

Leave the sunglasses at home, grin and bear it. And if the bright rays prove intolerable, ask the camera crew to move you to the shade.