TUESDAY TIP: “Anything else you’d like to add?”

You prepped for your print or taped TV interview, nailed the sound bite in your first response, and handled the tough questions with ease.

 

 

Great job! But the interview isn’t over.

 

 

Just as the reporter/host is about to wrap up, they ask you one final question:

 

Q: “Anything else you’d like to add?”

 

Here’s what you DON’T do.

 

A: “No. I think that’s all.”

 

Most guests are just glad to field questions without making any mistakes, and are perfectly fine to let the interview end. But why play defense when you can play offense?

 

Here’s how you handle the, “Anything else you’d like to add?” question:

 

Q: “Anything else you’d like to add?”

 

A: “Yes. <Insert sound bite>.”

 

This is the media interview version of a mulligan.

Take this time to repeat your sound bite – the one thing you hope the producer chooses as your on-the-record-statement. By doing this, you increase the chances that the news package will include the most important information, and you want to take advantage of every opportunity to make sure that happens.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

3 things to consider (and avoid) before you go on live TV

Last week was a study in what happens when props fail, both in public presentations and media interviews.

Props can be a great addition to help make your point, but please proceed with caution. You risk more by using the prop than not, so here are three things to consider (and avoid) before you go on live TV:

1. Use spell check! This floor poster made us LOL.

Last week, Sen. Maria Cantwell (now referred to as “Sen. Cantspell”) was trying to make a point against the Republican health care bill, yet forgot to spell check her prop. #YouHadOneJob

2. Props should never make an appearance in media interviews, and Kellyanne Conway proved why. Though she was using her flash cards to clear up confusion about the Russia saga, it didn’t seem to have the intended effect.

(We’re confused. We don’t understand.)

But also, the signs were a distraction from her main message. Instead of listening to what she said, we tuned her out to watch as she awkwardly broke the frame to pull the signs into the shot. When you have to pull props into a live shot, you’re doing it wrong.

3. Don’t be the punchline. Beware of any potential for a screen shot to be made into a meme. We saw this happen to President Trump when he lifted up a copy of a just-signed executive order. The prop took on a life of its own, not only creating memes, but also a meme generator.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Amazon Prime Day

In honor of Amazon Prime Day, a beloved national holiday, we thought we’d help fill your cart with everything you need for your next TV interview.

Our goal is to make sure you present your best self on camera, so we’ve compiled a list of the Top 6 products we recommend to make you shine (not literally) in your interviews.

You’ll thank us later…

1. Crest Whitestrips Supreme Professional Strength

2. Brush On Block Broad Spectrum SPF 30 Mineral Powder Sunscreen

3. Essie Nail Polish in Ballet Slippers

4. Batiste Dry Shampoo

5. Revlon Ultra HD Matte Lipcolor

6. MAC Studio Fix Pressed Powder

 

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: “The ceiling is the roof.”

The NBA Finals are done and basketball is over for the season, but we’re not ready to say goodbye just yet.

On this Tip Tuesday, let’s look to the G.O.A.T., Michael Jordan, as we consider what not to do in our media interviews.

During halftime of a high-stakes basketball game against Duke (the chief rival of his alma mater), Jordan told us “the ceiling is the roof.” Excuse me, what?

Jordan was attempting to highlight how bright the future is for UNC and its athletic program by stating “the ceiling is the roof.” To which we say A for effort, but no dice.

In response, social media blew up, jokes were made at MJ’s expense all over the Internet, and t-shirts with the phrase quickly went on sale.

What Jordan meant to say, nobody knows. Maybe it was “reach for the stars” or “the sky’s the limit.” Regardless, we’re going to use this as a teachable moment.

 

You should include examples and metaphors in your talking points, but only if you use them correctly. Otherwise, you risk launching a swag sale and meme competition. If your goal is to get your message out (as it should be), make sure you know what you’re talking about.

 

Mixed metaphors happen to the best of us, so here’s an exhaustive list to confirm you’re not throwing the bath out with the baby water.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: A blueprint for hostile questions

Last week marked a stunning moment in America as we watched Sen. Bernie Sanders and other Senators repeatedly attack Russ Vought, the administration’s nominee for deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), not on his qualifications for the job but on his personal faith.

Irate that Vought stood by his Christian beliefs, Sanders concluded his line of questioning by stating: “I would simply say, Mr. Chairman, that this nominee is really not someone who is what this country is supposed to be about.”

Though he didn’t come out and say it, Sanders seemed to suggest one’s faith makes him or her unfit to serve public office. (Have you even read the Constitution?! Please see the First Amendment.)

The exchange between several U.S. Senators and a professing Christian was shocking, but there is good news. Vought gave us a blueprint for how to respond to hostile questions – faith-based or otherwise.

On this Tip Tuesday, let’s analyze Vought’s stellar performance:

 

He did two very important things: 1) he stated what he is, not what he’s not and 2) he never repeated accusations.

 

By only stating what he is and not repeating accusations, Vought successfully stood his ground and won the exchange. He wasn’t defensive, he was confident. And he won the sympathy of the viewing audience.

Now, go and do likewise.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Correcting the host

We’ve all been there. An introduction gone wrong, and no one knows if it’s polite to offer a correction. But what happens when it occurs in a live interview in front of millions (rough estimate) of people?

 

Q: “Should I correct the host?”

A: “No, and here’s why…”

 

Offering a correction can break your rapport with the host, embarrass them, or lead to an uncomfortable moment which could sidetrack your interview. Instead, extend some grace and let it slide. This also applies to fellow guests/panelists who mispronounce your name, title, organization, or a line in your bio.

But like any good rule, there is an exception – DMG recommends correcting the host or fellow guest/panelist if they say something that changes the essence, meaning, or intention of what you are saying or have said. Jump in and politely clarify if you feel like they misrepresented you and/or your message.

ICYMI, past Tuesday Tips have focused on sunglassessleeves, and sweat. All are worth a read as the temps increase this week.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Don’t let ’em see you sweat!

When you live in a swamp like DC, avoiding sweat becomes a full-time hobby in the warmer months. And if Al Gore can be trusted (jk!), this “planetary emergency” called summer is about to trigger our sweat glands all over again, which can present a bit of a problem for TV interviews.

Couple the higher temps with nerves about speaking to the media and you risk looking like this:

So, how do you appear young and fresh in an interview that might have you hot, bothered, and sweaty?

Here are a few tips to avoid the “pit stain” look:

1.  Make sure the color and type of fabric you wear hides pit stains. Light colors (i.e. pastels) are a great option. Men, you can wear a jacket to easily hide any embarrassing marks. Women, make sure to wear breathable fabrics (no silk!).

2.  Apply baby powder or talcum powder after you apply deodorant. It will absorb extra sweat in the armpit area.

3.  Undershirts – hot and annoying, but they work.

4.  Opt for a ride (taxi, Uber, Lyft) instead of walking to/from the interview location.

5.  We heard somewhere that caffeine makes you sweat more. But there’s no way we’re giving up our coffee, so we don’t expect you to either. Instead, apply tips 1-4 and hope for the best.

ICYMI, we’ve also tackled the appropriateness of sunglasses and sleeves in TV interviews. Click to read more!

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Sleeves

As we transition our wardrobes from “phew, this sweater hides my extra brownies” to “OMG IT’S SWIMSUIT SEASON!,” we thought we’d breakdown the appropriate sleeve length on camera.

Hint, hint. This isn’t it:

Sleeve length matters in a tight camera shot. Going sleeveless is fine for women if the strap is wide—a too-skinny strap and it’ll look like you’re wearing a bathing suit on national TV.

Ladies, since we’re pretty sure Megyn Kelly’s look isn’t what you’re going for, here are two DMG-approved options:

Whichever option you chose–sleeves or no sleeves–you need to commit. Why? Because a mid-sleeve or cap sleeve tends to cut off the arm in a weird spot. You know what else makes your arm look segmented?

Cutting off your own sleeves.

Maybe this goes without saying, but…DON’T DO THIS ^^

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Sunglasses in a TV interview. Yay? Or nay?

NAY. ALWAYS NAY. But let us explain…

Temps are rising, days are getting longer, and we’re finally moving outdoors – both personally and professionally.

What do we mean?

The possibility of a TV interview outside is a real and present danger in the coming months, and so we want you to be prepared. Over the next few weeks, we’ll highlight what to do and what NOT to do in front of the camera in the great outdoors.

Today’s focus is your eyes. Specifically, what NOT to do.

Q: “Can I wear sunglasses in TV interviews outside?”

A: “No. And here’s why…”

 

Obviously, this is an extreme example, but it proves our point. Though we understand that the sun (or any bright light) can be distracting, resist the temptation to keep those cool aviators on when the camera is rolling.

We know that wearing sunglasses makes your experience better, but it makes the viewer’s experience worse. We want to be able to make eye contact with someone, or watch people make eye contact with each other. It’s how we judge people’s character and the validity of their statements.

Leave the sunglasses at home, grin and bear it. And if the bright rays prove intolerable, ask the camera crew to move you to the shade.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

B²: “Does this make me look fat??

‘Tis that time again for all things chocolate and love and #RelationshipGoals.

But what seems like a joyous occasion can take a dark turn if you’re confronted with (and fumble) the question: “does this make me look fat??”

Yikes. Not a question anyone wants to answer honestly. So, how do you remain truthful and not devastate the asker?

Good thing it’s Tuesday, Valentine’s Day AND B² day.

Here’s this week’s likely question from your significant other and the B² (block and bridge) that keeps you off the couch and/or out of the dog house:

 

Q: “Does this <insert article of clothing> make me look fat?”

B²: “You are stunning. I really love that (color/style/neckline – element of clothing not related to size) on you. <Insert how beautiful she is for all the reasons>.”

 

Guys, wherever you take the conversation next, do not pass go, do not collect $200, DO NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION. It’s a trap. You actually can’t answer this question as presented and win. You have to block and bridge. Don’t you dare let your ego tell you otherwise. Just accept that this is a trap and answer as we’ve instructed.

Ladies, give your guy a break and listen to what he says, not what he doesn’t say. You’ve put him in a terrible position by asking this question because he either has to lie or tell the truth, neither of which we want to hear, tbh.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.