TUESDAY TIP: Equal Pay Day

According to the National Committee on Pay Equity, Equal Pay Day “symbolizes how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year.”

Excuse me? If true, this is horrifying. And if true, it’s easy to understand why people usually present an emotional argument in defense of the gender pay gap.

But the defenders are wrong, and we have the data to prove it.

Watch as Christina Hoff Sommers of the American Enterprise Institute summarizes what the data tells us about the gender pay gap:

The good news is we have facts on facts on facts to combat this myth. The bad news is we’re trying to dismantle an emotional and false narrative. Tread carefully.

Here’s how we recommend you respond when confronted with an unfair question or false claim about Equal Pay Day:

Q: <Insert false claim or unfair question about the gender pay gap>.

A: “If what you say is true, we should all be outraged. But the reality is <insert talking point>.”

Wherever you take the conversation next, validate the emotion of the other side before you make your case. If you don’t, people will assume you don’t care. And if people assume you don’t care, they’ll stop listening. Reiterate that you would share their outrage if the disparity existed. It’s just you know it doesn’t. So, really, you’re the bearer of very good news. Adopt this approach, and we guarantee you’ll change hearts and minds on the gender pay “gap.”

Interested in DMG’s services? Contact us! We’d love to work with you.

The gift that keeps on giving.

You guessed it! The gift that keeps on giving is what DMG does best: media training.

Whether you’re new to interviews or just want to improve your performance, it’s always a good time to purchase a session for yourself and the media star (or stars) in your life.

DMG offers customized training to highlight strengths, increase confidence, and refine message delivery. Sessions can be organized for individuals or groups in hourly, half day, and full day increments, and all interview formats are fair game – TV or radio; satellite or in-studio; live or taped.

We know that every media interview is important, so let us help you be your best self behind the mic.

Become your best self and contact us today.

The perfect gift for the busy media star in your life.

Know someone on your Christmas list who will benefit from on-the-go media training? Then gift them a Clip Critique!

A Clip Critique is a review of a recent radio or TV interview that covers all the important points in your verbal, vocal, and visual (if applicable) delivery.

We’ll also include tips and tricks to achieve more polished talking points, interview prep techniques, and body language advice.

The best part?

This can all be done via email. After we receive a link to the interview, we will write up a critique and send it back. This process is simple, comprehensive, and it requires no in-person time for you or the recipient.

The best way to improve is feedback and practice, and we know you want the best for your loved ones. So, give the busy media star in your life the gift of a Clip Critique this holiday season.

Become your best self and contact us today.

The one gift everyone should have on their list

Speaking well in public is a gift, and one that you should consider giving this holiday season.

We’ve all been tasked to do it – a presentation at work, speaker introduction at an event, announcements in church, etc. And if you haven’t found yourself behind a mic and in front of a crowd, chances are you will soon.

Yet, it’s true that the average person fears public speaking more than spiders, shark bites, and even death. Just ask Jerry Seinfeld…

This doesn’t have to be true of you or your loved ones, so let us help!

With our combined decades of experience, we’ve helped policy analysts, elected officials, CEO’s, and those brand new to the task polish their public speaking skills so they are confident behind the mic.

Give the gift of communicating well by purchasing a one-on-one public speaking training. (Or forward this email to someone in charge of shopping for you this holiday season!)

Our public speaking training is catered to your level of experience and desire for improvement. From critiquing clips to on-the-spot training and feedback, our team will work to identify strengths and weaknesses as well as strategies to further polish your public speaking style.

Become your best self and contact us today.

How to avoid speculation

Much has been made about the timing of a big legislative victory for Republicans before the 2018 midterms. Will tax reform be that victory?

President Trump certainly hopes so – remember that one time he asked for a bill by Thanksgiving?

Because no one knows for sure what will happen or when, you’re left to speculate if asked about a timeline. But don’t give in!

Here’s how we recommend you respond. Hint: remain hopeful.

 

Q: “Will the GOP get tax reform done by the end of the year?”

A: “I can’t speculate on a timeline, but I am hopeful that Americans will finally get a tax break. <Insert talking point.>”

 

Wherever you take the conversation next, emphasize all the reasons you think tax reform should pass, not whether it will pass. And remain hopeful in your response. Tax reform is a good and necessary move, and we want to emphasize that message whenever we’re asked about it.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

 

Road Rage

We’ll all encounter road rage this holiday season – some of us will cause it by “driving defensively,” and some of us will experience it thanks to the too-slow driver in the passing lane.

Regardless, here are a few tips to communicate effectively from the driver’s seat and avoid the fender bender that keeps on giving in the form of a higher deductible.

Eye Contact
Just like eye contact is key in an on-camera interview, it’s also a great way to guilt someone into letting you merge. And if you smile while making eye contact? Game over.

Once you’ve successfully merged, make sure to wave “thank you” to the driver who let you in.

Use that horn for good
Not all honks are created equal. If possible, communicate with a friendly honk. A light “excuse me” or “you’re about to hit my bumper” tap go a long way to de-escalate the situation.

Be self-aware
If you follow no other rules of the road this holiday season, please follow these two:

  1. The left lane is for passing ONLY. You will anger other drivers and impede the flow of traffic if you stubbornly choose to drive in this lane regardless of speed. Please drive on the right.
  2. If you anticipate needing to merge because your lane is ending, don’t drive all the way to the end of the lane and cut in front of those waiting in line. Abide by the zipper effect. Be kind, and get in line.

We wish you happy and safe travels!

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

Thanksgiving: Bad Food Edition

Want to avoid an awkward Thanksgiving?? Because we do!

Whether you plan to spend the holiday with family, friends, or perfect strangers, we all risk eating a meal (or part of a meal) that doesn’t quite measure up.

Thankfully, (see what we did there?) DMG has a few tips for complimenting the host, even if the food leaves you in a McDonald’s drive-through on the way home. 

Consider one of the following reactions: 

“I haven’t had this type of green bean casserole before! What’s your secret?”

…or… 

“Where did you get this recipe? Is it a family recipe?”

…or…

“Such a unique flavor, I can’t put my finger on what it is. How did you prepare <insert food>?”

Because it may be difficult to articulate a positive food experience without lying, you can always fall back on complimenting the effort it took to prepare the meal:

“Wow, did you make that pie crust by hand? That must have taken you a long time!”

Be positive. Be enthusiastic. And if all else fails, compliment the wine. 

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: How to talk tax reform

The Republican’s tax reform bill entered the markup process in the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday. Given that passage of this bill would lead to the largest change in the tax code since 1986, this is a BFD.

With every tax reform discussion, the talking points write themselves. The Left cries about a tax cut for the rich, while conservatives support the idea that more money in the hands of job creators leads to…more jobs.

This attempt is no different. The current proposal to lower the corporate tax rate from 35% (The highest in the developed world! Higher than France!) to 20% is significant, and has ignited the aforementioned class warfare discussion.

(FUN FACT: Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer were all too happy to champion a cut in the corporate tax rate a few short years ago.) 

So, how can you fight false rhetoric when advocating for corporate tax reform?

Don’t let the other side define the premise. They will always use words and phrases like: “big business,” “corporation,” and “the rich,” even if the majority of people who stand to benefit from the tax cut don’t fall into these categories. For those of us who own small businesses and know how to operate a calculator (like DMG!), we know that the “corporate” and/or “big business” labels don’t define us.

Words matter, so make sure you talk about “small businesses,” “start-ups,” or “family-owned companies” to paint an accurate picture of who will benefit from this tax cut.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

Smiling’s my favorite!

Stand tall: check!
Good cell reception: check!
No background noise: check!
Smile: check…?

While it might be weird to add “smile” to your radio interview check list, it’s important that you maintain the same facial expressions you would for a TV interview. Even though radio isn’t the visual medium that TV is, using facial expressions changes the way your voice sounds and forces you to be more animated. It’s true that people can hear you smile even though they can’t see you smile.

So, next time you have a radio interview, or perhaps next time you’re on the phone with a family member, practice sounding more engaged. Stand up, smile, and look at yourself in the mirror to watch yourself engage with your invisible audience.

Trust us, you’ll sound more conversational if the audience can hear your emotions.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.

TUESDAY TIP: Don’t be like Phil Davison…

It’s one of our favorite political campaign speeches EVER. Not because it’s great, but because it’s so incredibly awful.

So while we suffer through the last two weeks of a few ho-hum campaigns (ahem, VA), we thought we’d remember more exciting times. Like the times of Phil Davison…

Phil Davison, a Republican running for Stark County Treasurer in Ohio, delivered this impassioned speech before a vote for nomination to the office. What starts out as a run-of-the-mill candidacy speech, quickly escalates to full out screaming. Perhaps even more entertaining than the sudden escalation of emotion and volume are the times his outbursts seem uncontrollable.

“AND A MASTER’S DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION.”

“I WILL NOT APOLOGIZE FOR MY TONE TONIGHT.”

“THIS IS THE OPPORTUNITY WE’VE BEEN WAITING FOR.”

While Phil offers us endless entertainment, there’s a fairly obvious lesson to be learned about emotion and volume when speaking in public or in your media interviews. Emotion is great. It connects you to your audience, makes you seem more approachable, and keeps people tuned in. However, when you turn your performance switch “on,” make sure slow and steady wins the race. Avoid the zero to 60 approach, unless you want to end up on CNN or the Washington Post’s “best political rants of all time” list.

Need more messaging help and/or media polishing? Become your best self and contact us today.